Invasion Day 89 – Summary

The summary of the 89th day of Russian invasion to Ukraine, as of 22:00 – 23rd of May 2022 (Kyiv time).

Day summary:

The most difficult situation remains in the area of Siverskyi Donets. Ukrainian troops retreated from Svitlodarsk Arc and nearby areas to avoid encirclement. Russian forces have launched an attack on Lyman and have a partial success. The situation remains unchanged on other frontlines.

Russia continues to shell Ukrainian positions near the  border in Sumy and Chernihiv Oblasts.

Kharkiv Frontline

includes the area of Kharkiv and Chuhuiv

partly sunny | ~17 °C

Shelling: Prudianka, Ternova, Husarivka, Chepil

Russian forces attempted to regain control of Ternova, but the attack wasn’t successful, and the enemy retreated to its original positions.


Siverskyi Donets

includes the area of Slovyansk, Kramatorsk and Bakhmut

partly sunny | ~18 °C

Shelling: Dolyna, Bohorodychne, Studenok, Svyatohirsk, Lyman, Dibrova, Ozerne, Sievierodonetsk, Zolote

Russian troops attacked Ukrainian positions at Dovhenke, but the assault was repelled. The enemy also attempted to capture Toshkivka and Lypove, but wasn’t successful.

After a few days of preparations, Russian forces have launched an attack on Lyman and reportedly entered the outskirts in the evening.

Russian troops captured a forwarded Ukrainian checkpoint at Zolote, but the situation in the town itself is unclear. It’s likely the Ukrainian forces retreated or will retreat in coming hours to more favorable positions.

At Svitlodarsk Arc, Ukrainian troops retreated from the contact line to avoid encirclement. They also blew a bridge and nearby dam to slow down the Russian advance. The enemy has captured Troitske and Myronivskyi as the result. They haven’t yet entered Svitlodarsk itself, but Ukrainian forces reportedly retreated today.


South-Eastern Front

includes Donetsk and Zaporizhzhia Oblast

cloudy | ~18 °C

Donetsk Oblast

Shelling: Avdiivka, Novoselivka Druha, Novomykhalivka, Mykilske

Ukrainian forces noted a decrease of combat activity in the vicinity of Avdiivka and Marinka.

Zaporizhzhia Oblast

Shelling: Orikhiv, Huliaipole

There was no change on the ground in Zaporizhzhia Oblast.


Kherson Frontline

includes the vicinity of Kherson and Mykolaiv

rain | ~16 °C

Mykolaiv Oblast

There was no change on the ground in Mykolaiv Oblast.

Kherson Oblast

Ukraine reports that Russian forces are building trenches and fortification in the area of Posad-Pokrovske, indicating they are much closer to the town than we previously knew.


Full map

The full overview map of current situation.

Maps and article are based on the following sources:

General Staff of the Armed Forces of Ukraine, official channels of Ukrainian regional administrations, Ukrainian Ministry of Internal Affairs, Ukrainian Ministry of Defense, Security Service of Ukraine (SBU), press released of Russian Army, DPR and LPR (taken with a grain of salt)

Visit our Deployment map for updated interactive map of captured areas and Ukrainian units.

Make sure to follow us on Twitter & Telegram for the latest updates on Ukraine.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
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Fjose Smørhatt

Russians seems to be gaining momentum in the east, unfortunately.

Henry Whitworth

Not really. They’ve just narrowed down their offensive to an ever smaller front and they’re pushing every BTG they can get to move into that one area. This battle of attrition does not favor them as Ukraine mobilizes their nation for war. If Russia had a capable army they would have just fixed the Ukrainian forces in the east of the big salient while driving in behind them from the north and south. That was the possible war winning move at the beginning of this big offensive. They didn’t even come close to being able to achieve that so they just claw for any ground they can get out in front of them before the offensive runs out of steam. What we’re watching now is desperation. It’s murderous on that front to be sure as they have a big advantage still in massed artillery. But they haven’t been able to use that for anything other than a slow grind at great cost.

An army can make tactical gains on a map even as they’re losing the wider war.

Fjose Smørhatt

Russians up until now have experienced setback after setback, but if the Russians continue to concentrate their force in the east there’s a serious risk of Ukrainian forces being encircled in the Sievierodonetsk area. That would be a major win for the Russians tactically, and it could shift sentiment among Russian friendly countries internationally into starting supporting Russia more. Butterfly and ripple effects etc.

Russia’s scorched earth, as sickening and vile as it is, is also a problem for Ukraine. Russians can in theory take whatever they want, they just have to pulverize it enough before they go and take it, like they did in Popasna. Mariupol was a failure, but they have probably learned from their mistakes.

Last edited 1 month ago by Fjose Smørhatt
Henry Whitworth

But if they take all of Donbas by the same cost they paid in Popasna they need about 12 million soldiers. Yes, they can concentrate firepower and take a town but it’s an incredibly expensive way to take ground and this aint the Red Army with bottomless reserves.

Consider that Ukraine has had the option of pulling out of Sievierodonotetsk all this time. They see what’s coming at them and they can read a map. There’s a reason they choose to stay out in these salients and bleed the Russians for every kilometer they take.

Calling any of this a “major win” is definitely a matter of moving goalposts for Russia. This offensive was to conquer the Donbas. Just about 5000 square miles to go if they take Sievierodonotesk. They will gloat over any tactical victories they make, of course, but the overall strategic impasse they face isn’t changing at all. They can’t afford a grinding attritional battle in this one cauldron while Ukraine takes shipments of Western weapons and trains entire new battalions out west.

People are just looking at arbitrary targets and thinking, “Is this where Russia wins the war?” But they have to defeat the Ukrainian army and their will to fight or the Ukrainians are going to keep coming back at them. And that army is getting stronger, not weaker.

RutilantBossi

I have a little question, how many people work on this website? Do you do all the stuff? From research to coding and even the maps? If that’s the case Kudos to you, this is impressive

Jeff

3 months and everyone is utterly impressed with the Ukrainian defense and utterly dismayed by the ineptitude and incompetence of the Russians. The Russians are running out of steam. Their losses are so substantial we are seeing conscripts with WWII bolt action rifles and BMP-1s on the battlefield. Don’t be suppressed to see T-62s and even T-55s from Russia soon. They are even pulling their forces out of Syria and Libya to fill in for the losses. They won’t even gather up their dead because they don’t want to send them all back home. This will turn out to be the worst military blunder of the 21st century. It’ll be interesting to see the Russian public reaction when they finally realize what is happening.

Tony

T-62 have already been spotted being reactivated and sent to Ukraine.

Azog

If you have A LOT of outdated tanks and you use them as a self-propelled artillery, what’s the problem? Star Wars Walkers are awesome of course, but not terribly practical

Zakhar

You are extremely poorly informed. 
(1) If anyone is fighting with old weapons, it is the armies of the people’s republics, not regular Russian troops. 
(2) Russia is still fighting only with contract soldiers, while in Ukraine there is a general mobilization and officially and unprepared territorial defense is being sent to the front. So who has problems after that?
(3) Ukraine has enormous losses, only 5 thousand soldiers were captured near Mariupol

Jeff

Russia is losing BIG TIME. I can’t wait until July when they will be pushed back on ALL fronts. Putin will FALL.

Jeff

If you can’t see the writing on the wall you are blind

kevin

Minsk agreement was supposed to prevent all this.

XPOINT

They thought it was an unfair deal. But this is the most bearable of all bad things. They can try to find a mutually acceptable solution through continuous negotiations.

There are many similar regions in the world, such as Japan’s four northern islands, China’s Taiwan, Argentina’s Falkland Islands, South Korea’s Dokdo, Turkey’s Cyprus, Northern Ireland, etc.

Last edited 1 month ago by XPOINT
XPOINT

Thank you, webmaster, for noticing my remarks and for your excellent work. Yes, you are quite right. I do not ignore this. Many factors will point to the events in Crimea in 2014.
I would like to make some additions:
1. If we want to get to the bottom of it, we need to go back and analyze it from the disintegration of the Soviet Union.List and analyze what politicians in the US, EU, Ukraine and Russia have done.
2. As I said in my comment, this is a bad thing without other choice. It is not realistic to want to take it back by force.
3. I don’t think it’s right for Russia to occupy other countries’ territory, I only state the facts and judge the winners and losers on the battlefield.

Hope to understand that I do not support either side on this battlefield.

My basic position is that I am against the US constantly creating geopolitical crises and planning wars everywhere.

Last edited 1 month ago by XPOINT
Azog

China for some reason said recently that it was the US who instigated this crisis. But, well, who cares about what this small insignificant country thinks, right?

XPOINT

 I want to say Biden has something to do with this war. this is a long and complicated story.

DavidC

So

Last edited 1 month ago by DavidC
Uraken

The Minsk agreement was a way to help Putin. It was designed by Putin fanboys like Steinmeier. Its only purpose was to screw over Ukraine and help the “friend” in the Kremlin.

Henry Whitworth

The people zooming ever closer on the map to make Russia’s local tactical gains look like big sweeping movements are akin to someone looking at an extreme closeup of a snail moving over a pebble and saying, “Look how FAST it’s going!”

They were supposed to encircle all or most of the Donbas and trap the creme of the Ukrainian military in a “cauldron,” remember? They haven’t pulled off ANY big maneuvers that create some massive imbalance of attrition in their favor. They pay a high price everywhere they creep forward by a few kilometers and this has been going on for months. Do people imagine Putin’s army, originally fewer than 200,000, having lost much of their best armor, many of their capable soldiers, and a shocking number of officers, is going to just keep grinding forward infinitely? This is their big offensive. They’re throwing it in. This is not what winning looks like. They aren’t taking out or even significantly degrading the Ukrainian military which is building fresh battalions with Western weapons behind the lines.

Look at the forest instead of a select few trees in the small part of the country where Russia still fights on the offensive. An army can make some tactical gains even as they’re in the process of losing a war.

Last edited 1 month ago by Henry Whitworth
XPOINT

Tens of thousands of deaths, millions of refugees, the loss of one-third to one-half of the economy, the loss of the Azov Sea and even the Black Sea, the loss of entire territories in important industrial areas, what are the gains?
which of these can fit a pebble?
which is the tree? which is the forest?

Last edited 1 month ago by XPOINT
Henry Whitworth

And what kind of tree?!? Is it a poplar? A oak? THeSe are teh imPortant kwestions!

Thanks for your feedback.

XPOINT

What I am saying is exactly as you said, a phenomenon is just a tree, and there is a forest behind the tree.
Thank you for your kindness.

XPOINT

BUT, if havn’t it thought that they were weak and they were slow, the war would have froze in the first place. is it good or bad?

Zakhar

It’s funny to read how Ukraine’s successes in the Kharkiv direction are being inflated here, although in fact they have taken control of several villages with a population of up to 5 thousand people around the city there

XPOINT

When the strongest part of the Ukrainian army is lost in the Donbass, Kharkiv will be an isolated city. It is covered with a dark cloud now.

Henry Whitworth

That talking point is about two months old. You should have them give you some new ones when they drop off your cigarettes and vodka.

XPOINT

I think everyone has the right to his own thought.if can’t mutual understanding, at least we should mutual respect.
I one is different from you, he must be Russian or in Russia side?

Last edited 1 month ago by XPOINT
Henry Whitworth

Well, in Russia one does not have a right to his own thought and “mutual understanding” is enforced. So shilling for Russia while whining about “independent thought” is ultimately pretty ridiculous.

XPOINT

I noticed that in Russia there were people who supported the West, people were arrested, I think every country does that in a state of emergency in a war (in Ukraine, the punishment for anti-war is to tie them to a tree with scotch tape) . But in western countries, there is no war now, but I have also seen that everyone will be attacked indiscriminately even if they are neutral. Political correctness kidnaps everything, media and society, everyone.
In any case, an accurate description of the battlefield situation is better than blindfolded.

Henry Whitworth

Good one but “political correctness” is pretty yesterday. Fascists like Putin hammer on the boogeyman of “wokeness” now. Again, update those talking points! Bonus vodka.

XPOINT

OK, I would try to look for where YOU put the Bonus vodka, and have to say thanks to you.

Dominik

In the face of this war of aggression by the Russian fascists, being neutral is clearly the wrong way to go.

What decent person can stand by and be neutral in the face of this injustice?
Personally, I am ashamed of all the Putin defenders in Germany.

Henry Whitworth

I think Ukraine did the smart, predictable thing in the midst of weathering Russia’s offensive. They took advantage of an area where Russia wasn’t investing enough forces and they drove them out. It was a very good place for them to put some effort into a counteroffensive. They took pressure of Kharkiv which is functioning pretty well now and they threatened the right flank of the entire Russian position. So Russia has had to shift forces back up into that area to defend the supply lines for the Izium salient even as they’re needed to add weight to the offensive.

These are the kinds of considerations that are really more important at this point than the score-keeping going on by a lot of people based on kilometers on the map. Russia needs their offensive to sweep forward and take the Donbas region even as they seriously damage the Ukrainian military to prevent their ability to fight back that territory in coming months. The fact that they take some villages out there should absolutely be expected because they’re investing a great deal in the offensive. But what are they really getting for moving those lines on the map by a few kilometers here or there? The Ukrainians keep falling back into more defensive lines and punishing the attackers as they go. It’s EXACTLY what they need to be doing at this stage of the war.

Food for thought

Zakhar made a comparison to what you claim to be an exaggeration of Russian advance with the exaggeration of the Ukrainian counter offensive. Your answer was that the Ukrainians did what they were supposed to do and this counter offensive puts the flank of the Russian army in danger. So what is the difference if someone claims that the advance of the Russian army puts the crem de la crem of the Ukrainian army in danger by encircling them? Advance would be more difficult against the elite of the Ukrainian army but what happens if 15000-20000 of the best Ukrainian soldiers, who are battle hardened since 2014 and not conscripted and quickly trained, are captured? This is what you need to answer, as this is the goal of Russia, and not to advance again recklessly for tens of miles as they did at the first phase of the war.

Henry Whitworth

They threatened the flank of the Russian army in the north enough to force them to draw troops away from the concentration out east and they did this as they took pressure off of Kharkiv. So, yes, it was a successful maneuver. I have to weigh that against a maneuver that Russia has not made but may make out east? Why? Let’s see them encircle and capture the “crem de la crem” of the Ukrainian army and then we’ll talk about that. I don’t “need to answer” anything about some hypothetical accomplishment that hasn’t been made. That’s silly.

You sound like you’re influenced by a lot of Russian propaganda. Ukraine isn’t conscripting people and throwing them barely trained into the fight like Russia is. They’e shown a lot of discipline and patience in how they’ve deployed troops throughout this war.

Food for thought

Influenced about Russian propaganda? It’s only 90 days since the war began! How much time do you need to train properly a conscript? Has someone that has been in battles since 2014 the same experience with someone who went at the training camp a few days ago? How many days do you think that Ukrainians train their men before sending them to battle? You comment without any realism, presenting facts in a totally favourable way for one side and totally unfavourable for the other. Obviously things are not black and white for neither the Ukrainians nor the Russians. Otherwise Kherson, Marioupol and other areas wouldn’t have been under Russian occupation and the Ukrainian army would have been outside Moscow!

Henry Whitworth

lol

Food for thought

Something more. You claim that the counter offensive puts the Russian flank in danger (which they stopped with just moving some army in this area) but you reject that the Russian advance puts the Ukrainian army in danger of getting encircled and captured. Someone else could claim that this counter offensive that has been halted was a desperate attempt to stop the advance but didn’t work. Anyone can claim whatever they want like you do that you see massive losses of the Russian army but you ignore the massive losses of the Ukrainian army. Not even a day the Zelensky admitted 100 soldiers per day dying which is likely more since he claims only that. He has said before that their losses are just 3000 while the Russians have 22000!

Duško Dugouško

Fighters on the front lines have received instructions to advance carefully and minimize losses. This isn’t Iraq where you go in an occupy a country in 6 weeks by killing everything in sight like the US did which you would celebrate as an amazing victory. This is a civil war fought between two sides that are ethnically the same – slavs and think the same. It’s not the desert champ. It’s a real war. Why do you think all those mercenaries and volunteers decided to leave in the beginning? They warned it’s not like the middle east.

Henry Whitworth

Do they just give you guys a script or do you just sort of parrot the talking points and wing it?

ugotricrold

Ukraine is gonna win this war with their passion for their country and they have the strength too. Ukraine!

Zakhar

The General Staff of the Armed Forces of Ukraine officially confirmed the loss of Svitlodarsk:
“The Svitlodarsk arc is lost. Our military went out so as not to be surrounded”

Prahok

Thanks for keeping it succinct and avoiding being dragged too far into interpreting meaning out of movements on the ground.

Aleksey

Zelensky said in an interview that the Ukrainian army is 700 thousand people.
And how many people are fighting in the Russian Army?

XPOINT

The aftermath of the Donbass battle soon became apparent.
The cost of weapons, the salaries and compensation of soldiers, the bailout of the economy, the refugee problem, will become a bottomless pit for US and EU. How can they support Ukraine when their own economy is on the brink of collapse? This will create a huge debate among Western countries.

MJnova

Lol, you sir have a great humor.
The only economy on the brink of collapse is the RUSSIAN Economy.

“The West” is doing quite fine

Andy B

Huh? Are you daft?

Diego

Underestimating the West is not a good thing, nor is underestimating the Western economy. Russia has roughly the same GDP as Spain. Western pluralism and therefore also pro-Russian voices are part of a system, which is anything but weak.

XPOINT

@MJnova @Andy @B Diego

Have you forgotten “the European debt crisis”? Maybe you don’t feel it, but I believe your politicians are in a terrible fix now.
About Russia’s economy, the war has increased their income because oil and gas prices have gone up a lot.

Last edited 1 month ago by XPOINT
XPOINT

AND, I think that I am not underestimating anyone. Maybe you underestimated Trump’s 70 million votes and Le Pen’s 10 million votes.

Last edited 1 month ago by XPOINT
Spenny

No, we’re not. You’re counting votes, not those engrained in the cult of personality. Most of Donald’s votes are lifelong repubs who would vote Red if a dog ran for president not his minions (There are only two options). Keep dreaming that Russia has a remote chance against NATO. Both in terms of GDP and military, the US alone wiped the floor with Russia, not counting the 29 other countries in NATO.

Don’t think you need to turn around for us to see Putin’s hand up your ass

Erny72

NATO is really little more than the US plus some supporting cheer-squads, all of whom are entering recession. Their economic plight is helped by their insistence on pretending one can run a civilised economy without sufficient access to reliable energy, food and raw materials.
I’m curious to know when you claim the USA wiped the floor with Russia. You aren’t confusing Russia with Afghanistan are you? Oh, wait a minute…

Chris

Just wondering, how much do you earn at your Russian troll farm? You know most of the folks reading this site aren’t from fully propagandized countries and immediately see through your non-existent logic.

XPOINT

To see through oneself is better than to see through others.
Push yourself you will broaden your horizons.

Spenny

Brink of collapse? the Ruble has fallen 30 cents on the USD in the past week. It is Russia suffering, not the west lol. No debate here, we stand by our allies. Have fun depleting Russian resources on an unwinnable war leaving your country a hollow shell of what it used to be. This is just Ukraine, can you imagine how badly you will be destroyed against any country included in article 5? Like the threats you make against Finland? If Russia thinks they have tasted the firepower Nato has at the ready, they should make a move for Finland and find out….

XPOINT

I can’t find what is funny in a war.
Don’t you see when you are laughing, lots of Ukrainians that you maybe support to have already died, and many more will die soon.
Please try to find what is lost in your heart!

Last edited 1 month ago by XPOINT
Erny72

I hope you’re not taking investment advice from whomever told you the rouble lost 30 US cents against the dollar during the week! The reality is more like the dollar has clawed back three cents from it’s lowest rouble exchange over the last year.
https://www.xe.com/currencycharts/?from=USD&to=RUB&view=1Y

Varier

But still, ruSSia had 80% of the economic force of Italy – before the special operation.
With 40% of the revenue being lost within a year and no access to semiconductors beyond chinese ones, the perspective doesn’t look any good.

Needle

Thank you for your summary !

The Russian forces around Popasna seem to be advancing more slowly, and it seems unlikely that they will be able to move north to fully capture Luhansk.  The loss of Myronivskyi in the southern part of Donbas should have little impact, and the Ukrainian army could withdraw and defend along the river.

It’s almost 90 days, and it’s hard to say when Ukraine’s newly trained troops in the rear will be ready to move.

Henry Whitworth

I don’t think anything happening at the front is going to change their planning with the new units. They are going to train and equip them just how they’ve planned and then they’re going to choose where to fight them. Ukraine has shown remarkable discipline and patience since the invasion started. They husbanded combat power even as the rest of the world thought Kyiv was about to fall. They don’t panic. The Russian offensive is being ground down as they make small, costly, tactical gains. They’re losing because they aren’t winning anything big. The Ukrainians can keep falling back on more defensive positions in the Donbas over another 5000 square miles before Russia would take it all. They aren’t going to get close. And when they run out of steam Ukraine is going to be ready to start carving them up.

Xabin

It’s good to keep your spirits up, but you have to keep your feet on the ground. Russia, whatever it costs, will take over the two separatist regions, after which Ukraine will accept a truce since it does not have the capacity to recover the lost ground

PPP

This may very well be, but presenting it as an undeniably truth rips the comment of any merit. Personally I think Russia will manage Lugansk and the area’s (excluding the parts around Kherson) currently in their control. I also believe it will be hard to take back once the Russians are dug in. If Russia keeps pushing for the entire Donbass, the might overstretch (if they have not already). Regardless I think that in 10 to 20 years everything including Crimea might very well return to Ukraine one way or the other.

Henry Whitworth

I’m not sure why people are assuming Russia will fight any better on the defensive than they have on offense while they dominate so much in firepower. Yes, there are advantages to defense but you still need infantry that will stand firm and fight when they’re put under pressure.

When Russia’s offensive grinds down and they shift to a more defensive posture to try to hold the ground they’ve paid so much for they will also be giving the initiative to Ukraine. It will be these Ukrainian commanders who have surprised the world already with their intelligence and flexibility who will be deciding when and where to fight. Even though Russia will still have a larger bulk of artillery Ukraine will be able to concentrate and hit where they want. If they make tactical gains, they will be able to threaten the flanks of other positions and move the Russians out of entrenchments without having to hit all of them head-on. The fact that Russians aren’t capable of adroit maneuvers shouldn’t lead us to assume that Ukraine shares this disability.

macklen

Azov is biggest in Kharkiv. Shouldnt there be a regiment icon/counter for it there?

John

Ukranian forces need to retreat from Donetsk if they want to avoid total encirclement. Russian forces have captured the main roads which lead out of SeveroDonetsk and hence I wouldn’t believe that a total retreat would be possible. If Russia manages to encircle these divisions in Donetsk, it will gain an advantage and hence it will be able to push on Mikolayiv, Zaporozhia, Kharkov with much less resistance. Russia currently has the upper hand, I don’t care if you don’t like Russia, but thanks to the capturing of Popasnya it has gained a major advantage and probably will encircle a rather large Ukranian force in Donetsk. Call this propaganda, but its true.

Kris

Exactly what “main roads leading out of Severodonetsk” were captured by RF? Answer: none.

Azog

E.g. Bakhmut-Lisichansk road is within the range of Russian tube artillery. Based on some videos traveling on these roads is quite an adventure.

XPOINT

maybe soon someone will come to reply to you that what you said is an opinion, not a fact!

Azog

Some Ukrainian sources in fact mention some sort of a schism between the Ukrainian Army command and the Office of Zelensky on this topic. Army, quite logically, says that we have to save the army, so dear Mr President, give us the order to withdraw the troops so we could fight another day. But then there are political considerations. Army, even if destroyed, goes down swinging and in the meantime another army – in theory – can be raised. But if you simply withdraw, it means you’re leaving the territory, army is saved but dispirited, very bad for propaganda. Your political opponents will happily present you as a weakling. All kinds of interesting side effects might unfold.
The problem itself is millennia old. What do you sacrifice – men or land?
Russians in 1812 retreated to as far as Moscow, the commander was fiercely criticized and even accused of treason for this, but eventually they saved their army and later they prevailed. On the other hand Paulus in 1942 was told to stand and fight in Stalingrad, the result was a military and propaganda disaster for Wehrmacht. But in both cases it could have turned out otherwise. 
It is not inconceivable that if Ukrainian army starts to retreat from Donbass they will continue to do so until they see the Polish border, so I guess the idea is to hold the line at any cost and buy time.

XPOINT

The decision not to retreat is for political reasons.

They have to hold their ground in order to request weapons and financial aid from Western countries.

Once they retreat, the necessity or rationality of these aids is called into question.

Last edited 1 month ago by XPOINT
wye

The apparent failure to withdraw from the Lysychansk region (to avoid encirclement) does concern me. For a time it would have been easy, now more difficult. The pincers are trying to connect around them ever so slowly, but no move to escape that we can see. I cannot justify sacrificing these significant forces to buy time or, worse, to maintain international support/cash flow (I think this is spurious reasoning anyway – inflicting heavy casualties and withdrawing the effective forces intact to fight again is strong, not weak). To allow the Russians to take the territory is temporary in theory, while losing 20,000 (?) troops is both losing the territory and (permanently) those troops. Unacceptable. Why are we not seeing a withdrawal? If UA believes it can hold the pincers at bay and fight the Russians to a standstill in the region, ok…, but it seems a huge gamble when a gamble was not necessary. Maybe it is not a huge gamble to the UA command, maybe they have assessed it more optimistically, or are drawing the Russ in with plans to cut off the pincers. I remain concerned.

Azog

Maybe politicians – Ukrainian included – are more cynical and calculating than you might be thinking. We’ll see in the next hours/days how it unfolds around Lisichansk/Severodonetsk, but I wouldn’t be surprised at all if they are. The way I see it Russia is throwing in LDNR troops anywhere it can, Ukraine – territorial defence units, both often barely trained. Cruel reality of war

mark

The commander of Svitlodarsk took a wise decision and retreated in time. As the RF already cover the roads, it’s already too late for the troops in Lysychansk and Donetsk to retreat. The best thing they can do is “successfully evacuate” like some troops did in Mariupol and Lyman.

Dolgan

Remember to the battle of kiev, chernitiv or Kharkov .

Kris Wustrow

You sir are absolutely right!! Does everyone forget that at the beginning of this war, so many Ukrainian cities were surrounded/partially surrounded and the Ukrainian army or TDF garrison kept defending, thereby preventing Russian consolidation. …Kharkiv, Sumy, Chernihiv, Konotop, Nizhyn, Shostka, Okhtyrka … all of these were surrounded or partially surrounded in the first weeks of this war, but did not retreat or surrender!

Last edited 1 month ago by Kris Wustrow
ugotricrold

hello! thanks for the info about the war.

ugotricrold

by the way on the deployment map why does it show the 36th marine corps having no red under the symbol in Azovstal?

ugotricrold

what!? I was just asking Jerome a question!

Alex

The symbol for the 36th Marine Corps brigade also appears between Mykolaiv and Kherson, so perhaps it’s not shown in red because it wasn’t entirely deployed in Mariupol, and thus wasn’t entirely defeated? I’m not sure.

ugotricrold

Thanks I appreciate it have a good day.